FAA/CAA

FAAST Blast — Week of Feb. 05, 2018

FAA & FAASTeam News - Fri, 02/09/2018 - 09:52

FAAST Blast – NPRM Issued for Textron Airplanes, Maintenance Placards, How to Talk Like a Pilot
Notice Number: NOTC7607

FAAST Blast — Week of Feb. 05, 2018 – Feb. 11, 2018
Biweekly FAA Safety Briefing News Update
 

NPRM Issued for Textron Aviation Airplanes

The FAA last week proposed to issue a new airworthiness directive (AD) that would affect certain (Cessna) Textron Aviation 172/182/206/207/210 airplanes. A report of cracks found in the lower area of the forward cabin doorpost bulkhead prompted this notice of proposed rulemaking (NPRM). This condition is determined to be the result of metal fatigue. If not addressed, it could lead to failure of the wing in operation, which could result in loss of control.

The AD would require repetitive inspection of this area for cracks and would require owners to make any necessary repairs in accordance with the applicable Cessna service kit. The FAA estimates that this proposed AD affects 14,653 airplanes of U.S. registry. For more details on the inspection and repair requirements of this NPRM, as well as instruction for submitting comments, go to https://go.usa.gov/xnsEA. The comment period closes on March 19, 2018.

Maintenance Placards

The General Aviation Joint Steering Committee (GAJSC) has identified that attempting to fly in an aircraft currently undergoing maintenance, and not yet returned to service, is a causal factor in a number of fatal GA accidents. This month’s #FlySafe topic suggests adopting informal lock out/tag out procedures to ensure pilots are aware of un-airworthy aircraft conditions. See the fact sheet here: https://go.usa.gov/xnsPN.

How to Talk Like a Pilot

Pilots: How would you rate your aviation communication skills? Are you precise, yet concise? Courteous and classy? For important tips and techniques to improve your aviation lingo, have a look at the article, “How to Talk Like a Pilot” in the Jan/Feb 2018 issue of FAA Safety Briefing. Download your copy or read online at: 1.usa.gov/FAA_ASB. You can view a mobile-friendly version of this article at https://adobe.ly/2p7KwQb.

 

Produced by the FAA Safety Briefing editors, http://www.faa.gov/news/safety_briefing/
Address questions or comments to: SafetyBriefing@faa.gov.
Follow us on Twitter @FAASafetyBrief or https://twitter.com/FAASafetyBrief

Categories: FAA/CAA, News, US

Your ADS-B Questions Answered: Get the Facts Here Notice Number: NOTC7602

FAA & FAASTeam News - Thu, 02/08/2018 - 14:32

Question: Is ATC actually using ADS-B? I asked a controller to verify that my equipment was operating properly and she told me she did not have that information. How else can I verify that my equipment is operating properly?

Answer:  The FAA provides a free, easy way to check your Automatic Dependent Surveillance-Broadcast (ADS-B) performance. The ADS-B Performance Monitor (APM) captures all the broadcast ADS-B information in U.S. airspace.  The APM captures your aircraft’s ADS-B broadcast automatically, every time you fly. To verify the performance of your system, request a Public ADS-B Performance Report (PAPR) after any flight. Make your request by going to: https://adsbperformance.faa.gov/PAPRRequest.aspx.

You may do this anytime, at no cost. The PAPR will identify any erroneous information your equipment broadcasts. You can take the report to your avionics installer who can help rectify any issues. We encourage operators to check the performance of your ADS-B equipment after installation and annually thereafter.

ATC first began using ADS-B at selected sites in the United States in 2010, and the FAA has steadily expanded integration and use throughout the NAS. There are still some TRACONS in the NAS that require modernization to be able to utilize ADS-B, but the FAA is on track to enable ADS-B use at these remaining facilities before the 2020 mandate. 

The FAA’s ADS-B network collects your broadcasted ADS-B information and passes it to the ATC automation system. ADS-B data is then combined with other surveillance data (where available), to create a single track of your aircraft for the controller’s display.

ADS-B messages contain many different information elements that are combined and simplified for presentation to ATC in a way that supports their primary mission of maintaining safe separation of aircraft. This simplified presentation tells a controller whether an aircraft is equipped with ADS-B and whether ADS-B is contributing to the presentation. It does not give the controller any insight into how well the ADS-B is performing or if all information elements comply with the requirements of the ADS-B mandate. Therefore, we discourage pilots from asking controllers for ADS-B performance details since this can add to workload and frequency congestion.

Don’t Get Left in the Hangar. Equip Now!

There’s only 23 months remaining before the January 1, 2020 ADS-B Out equipage deadline.

For more information, please visit the Equip ADS-B website www.faa.gov/nextgen/equipadsb/.

Questions about equipping? Please see our FAQs or contact us at adsb@faa.gov.

Categories: FAA/CAA, News, US

FAA General Aviation Awards

FAA & FAASTeam News - Fri, 01/26/2018 - 16:31

We are very excited to announce the selection of Area Honorees for the 2018 General Aviation Awards. This year the FAA reorganized offices and no longer has “Regions” per se.  For our purposes, we divided offices into areas according to which time zone they are located.  Here are our 2018 Area Honorees:

District Office             Honoree                          Category
Kansas City, MO   Christopher Hope               Flight Instructor
Nashville, TN        Catherine Cavagnaro         FAASTeam Representative
North TX               Lloyd Timmons, II               Aviation Technician
Baltimore, MD       Helen Woods                     Flight Instructor
Baltimore, MD       C. William "Bill" Pancake   Aviation Technician
Boston, MA            Paul Carroll                       FAASTeam Representative
Denver CO            Ken Fukayama                  Flight Instructor
Scottsdale, AZ       Brent Crow                        FAASTeam Representative
San Jose               Eric Alan Cook                   FAASTeam Representative
Las Vegas             Dan Christman                   Flight Instructor
Las Vegas NV       Jon "Dave" Monti               Aviation Technician

Let's put the Area Honorees into their proper perspective.  Considering that the U.S. has five time zones, being selected to represent an Area places these people in the top five of all the flight instructors, maintenance technicians, avionics technicians or FAASTeam representatives nationwide.

This is only a step in the goal to be named the National Honoree, but it is a HUGE step and no small matter. Congratulations to our Honorees and good luck in the national competition.  National Honorees are scheduled to be chosen by January 30.

For questions or more information contact 
Arlynn McMahon, Chairman
General Aviation Awards Committee
www.generalaviationawards.org
2009 National Flight Instructor of the Year

Categories: FAA/CAA, News, US

FAAST Blast — Week of Jan. 22, 2018

FAA & FAASTeam News - Thu, 01/25/2018 - 10:26
 

FAA Safety Team | Safer Skies Through Education

FAAST Blast — Super Bowl NOTAM, AD Issued for Piper Fuel Tank Selector Placards, How to Talk Like a Pilot
Notice Number: NOTC7579

FAAST Blast — Week of Jan. 22, 2018 – Jan. 28, 2018
Biweekly FAA Safety Briefing News Update

 

Special Air Traffic Procedures for Super Bowl LII

In anticipation of a large number of aircraft operating in the Minneapolis−St. Paul metropolitan area during the week of Super Bowl LII, special security provisions will be in effect for this event including (but not limited to) Temporary Flight Restrictions (TFRs), two−way communication, and discrete transponder requirements. Pilots are encouraged to check NOTAMs frequently to verify they have the most current information. TFR information is normally disseminated by a FDC NOTAM 3 to 5 days prior to the event. Once published, text and graphic depictions of restrictions may be found at http://tfr.faa.gov. You can also read about the FAA's flight restrictions, notices, and published routes at www.fly2sb52.org.

 

AD Issued for Piper Fuel Tank Selector Placards

The FAA this week issued an Airworthiness Directive (AD) that applies to certain model Piper PA-28s. AD 2018-02-05 requires inspecting the fuel tank selector cover to verify that the left and right fuel tank selector placards are located at the proper positions and replacing those that are improperly located with new placards. The AD, which goes into effect on Feb. 7, 2018, was prompted by a quality control issue at the manufacturer that resulted in the installation of the fuel tank selector covers with the left and right fuel tank selector placards improperly located. For more details, see the AD at https://go.usa.gov/xnwhA.

 

How to Talk Like a Pilot

How would you rate your aviation communication skills? Are you precise, yet concise? Courteous and classy? For important tips and techniques to improve your aviation lingo, take a look at the article, “How to Talk Like a Pilot” in the Jan/Feb 2018 issue of FAA Safety Briefing. Download your copy or read online at: 1.usa.gov/FAA_ASB. You can view a mobile-friendly version of this article at https://adobe.ly/2p7KwQb.

 

Produced by the FAA Safety Briefing editors, http://www.faa.gov/news/safety_briefing/
Address questions or comments to: SafetyBriefing@faa.gov.
Follow us on Twitter @FAASafetyBrief or https://twitter.com/FAASafetyBrief

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Categories: FAA/CAA, News, US

Your ADS-B Questions Answered: Get the Facts Here

FAA & FAASTeam News - Wed, 01/24/2018 - 12:34

FAA Safety Team Notice Number: NOTC7575

Question: Will the January 1, 2020 ADS-B Out compliance date be extended? And is it true that the airlines have been allowed to delay their installation?   

 

Answer: The FAA has consistently demonstrated its commitment to the January 1, 2020 ADS-B Out compliance date.

 

The rule was published in May 2010, nearly ten years in advance to allow ample time for the production and installation of equipment on aircraft and complete deployment of the ATC ground network (completed in 2014). ADS-B is currently used by ATC in all but the smallest facilities where integration with the automation is on track to support the compliance date.

 

Equipment options are varied and plentiful; there are approved ADS-B systems for almost all aircraft types. Manufacturers share this information with the FAA which is available through a searchable database at www.faa.gov/nextgen/equipadsb/installation/equipment/adsb_ready/

 

The rumor that airlines have been given a delay to the January 1, 2020 ADS-B Out compliance date is not true. Exemption 12555 allows the use of older GPS equipment until 2025, but still requires that operators install and operate rule-compliant ADS-B Out equipment by January 1, 2020.

 

With all this in place, there is no need and no reason to expect a delay in the compliance date of January 1, 2020.

 

Don’t Get Left in the Hangar. Equip Now!

 

There’s only 24 months remaining before the 2020 ADS-B Out equipage deadline.

 

For more information, please visit the Equip ADS-B website www.faa.gov/nextgen/equipadsb/.

 

Questions about equipping? Please see our FAQs or contact us at adsb@faa.gov.

Categories: FAA/CAA, News, US

FAA Safety Team Government Shutdown

FAA & FAASTeam News - Mon, 01/22/2018 - 09:55

Government Shutdown
Notice Number: NOTC7573

The FAASTeam is currently shut down because of a lapse in appropriations. This prohibits FAA employees from being available to facilitate, present, or attend safety seminars. We will also not have access to our system to cancel meetings. There is potential that you will arrive at a safety meeting, and find there is no one to provide the meeting.

We are very grateful for the support of our FAASTeam Representatives. Any safety meeting that is produced by our Representatives who are not FAA employees may continue.

We ask for your patience, and apologize for the inconvenience. The FAASTeam will reopen once funding has been restored.

Categories: FAA/CAA, News, US

FAAST Blast — Week of Dec. 25, 2017

FAA & FAASTeam News - Fri, 12/29/2017 - 09:31

FAAST Blast – SAFO Issued for Rockwell Collins FMS, SAIB Calls for V-Band Coupling Inspections, Virtual Plan for the Real World
Notice Number: NOTC7539

FAAST Blast — Week of Dec. 25, 2017 – Dec. 31, 2017
Biweekly FAA Safety Briefing News Update

SAFO Issued for Rockwell Collins Pro Line FMS

On December 14, 2017, the FAA issued SAFO 17013 which informs the operators of Rockwell Collins Flight Management Systems (FMS) Pro Line 4 and Pro Line 21 FMS of the reinstatement of approximately 10,000 approach procedures and provides awareness to flight crews of the new Rockwell Collins Temperature Compensation Limitations. Operators should familiarize themselves with the information in this SAFO (https://go.usa.gov/xnEeb), as well as OPSB 0166-17R4 (bit.ly/RC17r4), which provides guidance for flight crews to operate Rockwell Collins systems or products.

SAIB Calls for V-Band Exhaust Coupling Inspections

A recent FAA Special Airworthiness Information Bulletin (SAIB) highlights an airworthiness concern with v-band coupling failures on all turbocharged, reciprocating engine powered aircraft, including rotorcraft. Cracks originating out of a spot weld, on multi-segment, spot welded, v-band couplings have led to separation of the outer band and failure of the v-band coupling to retain the tailpipe or exhaust inlet pipe. SAIB CE-18-07 recommends affected owners perform a detailed inspection of the couplings and replace the part as needed. For more details, including inspection criteria and photos, go to https://go.usa.gov/xnEtW.

A Virtual Plan for the Real World

Simulators allow pilots to practice dealing with dangerous or difficult situations without exposure to the risk that would normally accompany them. Learn how you can mitigate risk through simulation by reading the article, “A Virtual Plan for the Real World,” in the Nov/Dec 2017 issue of FAA Safety Briefing. Download your copy or read online at: 1.usa.gov/FAA_ASB. You can view a mobile-friendly version of this article at https://adobe.ly/2z7ci3k.

From all of us here at the FAA Safety Briefing team, we wish you a happy and safe 2018!

Produced by the FAA Safety Briefing editors, http://www.faa.gov/news/safety_briefing/
Address questions or comments to: SafetyBriefing@faa.gov.
Follow us on Twitter @FAASafetyBrief or https://twitter.com/FAASafetyBrief

Categories: FAA/CAA, News, US

NOTICE to Operators of Rockwell Collins Flight Management Systems Pro Line 4 and Pro Line 21

FAA & FAASTeam News - Mon, 12/11/2017 - 09:47

NOTICE to Operators of Rockwell Collins Flight Management Systems Pro Line 4 and Pro Line 21 FMS 3.3.x through FMS 4.x
Notice Number: NOTC7524

Notice to Operators of Rockwell Collins Flight Management Systems Pro Line 4 and Pro Line 21 FMS 3.3.x through FMS 4.x

From Rockwell Collins, Commercial Systems Customer Support

Subject: The FMS may turn in the wrong direction after sequencing a "Climb to" altitude that was manually edited or Temperature Compensated

Overview: 

If the crew manually edits or temperature compensates a "Climb to" altitude, the FMS will remove the database turn direction (if any) on the immediately following leg. The FMS will turn in the wrong direction after sequencing the "Climb to" leg if the shortest turn direction is different than the required turn direction onto the next leg.

For more information please see the attached PDF from Rockwell Collins of click here (https://www.faasafety.gov/files/notices/2017/Dec/OPSB_0166-17R2.pdf)

Categories: FAA/CAA, News, US

FAAST Blast — Week of Nov. 27, 2017

FAA & FAASTeam News - Wed, 11/29/2017 - 09:45

FAAST Blast – Kidde Fire Extinguisher SAIB, NTSB Seminar on Transition Training, Engine Maint. & Performance Monitoring, A-Z of
Notice Number: NOTC7507

FAAST Blast — Week of Nov. 27, 2017 – Dec. 03, 2017
Biweekly FAA Safety Briefing News Update

SAIB Issued for Kidde Fire Extinguishers

Last week the FAA issued a Special Airworthiness Information Bulletin (SAIB CE-18-05) for certain recalled Kidde fire extinguishers with plastic handles. These extinguishers, which may be found in GA aircraft, can become clogged or require excessive force to operate and can fail to operate during an emergency. The plastic handle fire extinguishers involve 134 models manufactured between January 1, 1973, and August 15, 2017. The FAA recommends you check your aircraft for any of the recalled Kidde extinguishers and replace it with one that is airworthy and not affected by the recall. For more details and a list of all Kidde models that are affected, go to https://go.usa.gov/xn8ZK.

NTSB Seminar on Transition Training

The lack of transition training has been a factor in many GA accidents. If you are in the Washington, D.C. area, there is a free seminar on Saturday, Dec. 2, at the NTSB Training Center in Ashburn, Va. Attendees will hear presentations from AOPA, NAFI, Cirrus Aircraft, and NTSB Member Earl Weener. This four-hour program is also FAA WINGS credit eligible. For more details and to register for the event, go to www.faasafety.gov/SPANS/event_details.aspx?eid=79494.

Engine Maintenance and Performance Monitoring

Don’t let your engine contribute to a loss-of-control accident. Proper engine maintenance, advanced pre-flight, and performance monitoring can go a long way to eliminating this type of mishap. Get the facts at: https://t.co/OivH7lAyZL

The A-Z of ATDs

Do you know the difference between a BATD and an AATD? Or how much credit allowance you can earn with each device towards flight training and/or experience requirements? The answers to these and other questions about Aviation Training Devices can be found in the Nov/Dec FAA Safety Briefing article, “The A-Z of ATDs — Sorting the Lot of Flight Simulation Devices.” Download your copy or read online at: 1.usa.gov/FAA_ASB. You can view a mobile-friendly version of this article at https://adobe.ly/2imT5QT.

 

Produced by the FAA Safety Briefing editors, http://www.faa.gov/news/safety_briefing/
Address questions or comments to: SafetyBriefing@faa.gov.
Follow us on Twitter @FAASafetyBrief or https://twitter.com/FAASafetyBrief

Categories: FAA/CAA, News, US

SAIB Issued for Kidde Fire Extinguishers

FAA & FAASTeam News - Wed, 11/29/2017 - 09:38

FAAST Blast — Week of Nov. 27, 2017 – Dec. 03, 2017
Biweekly FAA Safety Briefing News Update

SAIB Issued for Kidde Fire Extinguishers

Last week the FAA issued a Special Airworthiness Information Bulletin (SAIB CE-18-05) for certain recalled Kidde fire extinguishers with plastic handles. These extinguishers, which may be found in GA aircraft, can become clogged or require excessive force to operate and can fail to operate during an emergency. The plastic handle fire extinguishers involve 134 models manufactured between January 1, 1973, and August 15, 2017. The FAA recommends you check your aircraft for any of the recalled Kidde extinguishers and replace it with one that is airworthy and not affected by the recall. For more details and a list of all Kidde models that are affected, go to https://go.usa.gov/xn8ZK.

Categories: FAA/CAA, News, US

FAAST Blast: Week of Nov 13, 2017 Proposed ADs for Piper/Textron Aviation

FAA & FAASTeam News - Fri, 11/17/2017 - 13:35

Biweekly FAA Safety Briefing News Update

Proposed ADs for Piper/Textron Aviation

The FAA last week issued a Notice of Proposed Rulemaking (NPRM) that addresses reports of main wing spar corrosion found in certain Piper PA-28 and PA-32 Cherokee series airplanes. This proposed AD would require installing an inspection access panel in the lower wing skin near the left and the right main wing spars if not already there, inspecting the left and the right main wing spars for corrosion, and taking all necessary corrective actions. The FAA estimates the AD would affect 11,476 airplanes of U.S. Registry. For more details and for instructions on how to submit comments before the December 22 deadline, go to

www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/FR-2017-11-07/pdf/2017-24083.pdf.

            The FAA also revised an NPRM originally designed for Textron Aviation A36TC and B36TC Bonanza models to include all Textron Aviation Models S35, V35, V35A, and V35B airplanes that have the optional turbocharger engine installed. The proposed AD aims to prevent

failure of the exhaust tailpipe v-band coupling (clamp) that may lead to detachment of the exhaust tailpipe from the turbocharger and allow high-temperature exhaust gases to enter the engine compartment. The comment period for the NPRM has been reopened until December 26, 2017. For more, go to www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/FR-2017-11-08/pdf/2017-24065.pdf.

 

Aeronautical Chart Users Guide Revamped

Last month, the FAA’s Aeronautical Information Services (formerly, “AeroNav Products”) released a revamped Chart Users Guide (CUG). The CUG website offers improved navigation, updated information and expanded content, ranging from a more robust IFR Enroute & Terminal Terms section, to the addition of a “References & Abbreviations” and “What’s New” sections. The CUG is an unparalleled training and study aid for student pilots, Unmanned Aircraft System (UAS) operators, flight instructors, and anyone wanting to familiarize themselves with FAA charts and publications. It serves as a reference for both novice and experienced pilots alike, decoding the legends and information found on VFR charts, Helicopter Route charts, Flyway Planning charts, Terminal Procedure Publications and IFR Enroute charts. 

Download the new CUG at: faa.gov/air_traffic/flight_info/aeronav/digital_products/aero_guide

Runway Length Matters

            See the NTSB’s Safety Alert (SA-071) on Understanding the Potential Hazards on Intersection Takeoffs at www.ntsb.gov/safety/safety-alerts/Documents/SA-071.pdf.

 

Chart A Course for “Sim City”

Explore the exciting world of flight simulation technology and its evolving impact on aviation safety in our new issue of FAA Safety Briefing. Download your copy or read online at: 1.usa.gov/FAA_ASB. For a good primer on how flight simulators have evolved, check out author William Dubois’ article, “Link Trainer, to Desktop, to Redbird.” You can view a mobile-friendly version of this article at http://adobe.ly/2xLo5jO.

 

Produced by the FAA Safety Briefing editors, http://www.faa.gov/news/safety_briefing/
Address questions or comments to: SafetyBriefing@faa.gov.
Follow us on Twitter @FAASafetyBrief or https://twitter.com/FAASafetyBrief

Categories: FAA/CAA, News, US

Engine Maintenance and Performance Monitoring

FAA & FAASTeam News - Thu, 11/16/2017 - 08:06

Did you know that most general aviation fatal accidents are caused by in-flight loss of control? Many of these loss of control accidents are due to engine failure-related factors. Between 2001-2010, 35 of 70 randomly selected accidents had engine maintenance errors identified as a contributing factor. Proper engine maintenance, post maintenance, advanced pre-flight, and performance monitoring can go a long way to eliminating this type of mishap.

FAA Sound Maintenance Practices PDF

Categories: FAA/CAA, News, US

Flight Standards Service Terminology

FAA & FAASTeam News - Fri, 11/03/2017 - 11:09

Hi, folks -

We’ve received quite a few questions about the nomenclature everyone should be using to talk about our new structure. I addressed some of these issues in the October Monthly Message, but below is an expanded guide to Flight Standards Service terminology.

Thanks for the great work -

Best,
John Duncan

 

Proposed Summary of Intent:

Words are the tools we use to think, and how we think drives how we act. Using the right nomenclature for our new functional structure and its constituent parts reinforces and supports the critical cultural changes we continue to make in order to function as an interdependent team.

Flight Standards Service

  • The nomenclature for the overarching organization is “Flight Standards Service.”
    • The acceptable short forms are “Flight Standards” or “the Service.”
    • The acceptable abbreviation is “FS.”

 

Flight Standards Functional Offices

  • Use the name of the functional office(s) in policy, correspondence, training, and any other formal documents, as well as in verbal communication.
    • Acceptable short forms include Standards, General Aviation, Air Carrier, and Business.
    • Acceptable abbreviations include SS, GA, AC, and FB.

 

Constituent Organizations (e.g., Divisions, Frontline Offices)

  • Use the name of the division(s) and/or office(s) in policy, correspondence, training, and any other formal documents, as well as in verbal communication.
  • Frontline offices (e.g., Flight Standards District Offices, Certificate Management Offices, Aircraft Evaluation Groups, and International Field Offices) retain their legacy names.
    • Legacy abbreviations (e.g., “FSDO,” CMO,” “AEG,” “IFO”) are acceptable.
  • Aircraft Evaluation Groups have been renamed based on their area of specialty. Short forms are:
    • Small Aircraft AEG
    • Propulsion and APU AEG
    • Transport Aircraft Seattle AEG
    • Transport Aircraft Long Beach AEG
    • Rotorcraft & Powered Lift AEG

 

Universal Norms for Nomenclature

  • Use the actual name of the organization in policy, correspondence, training, and any other formal documents, as well as in verbal communication.
    • As necessary, use "the appropriate Flight Standards Office." This practice is not intended to create generic offices; rather, it is to prevent having to make another rule change if we were to develop another kind of office.  
  • Limit use of organizational routing codes to coordination grids. Internal routing codes should never be used in written or verbal external communications, including e-mail.
  • Location-reference terms such as “headquarters,” “field,” and “remotely sited inspector” are inaccurate. As appropriate, use “standards” or, for the Air Carrier and/or GA functional offices, “safety assurance.” Regardless of physical proximity to their assigned units, all inspectors are “Aviation Safety Inspectors” or ASIs.

 

 

 

Legacy

New

Term

Flight Standards Service

Flight Standards Service

Short Form

AFS

Flight Standards

The Service

Abbreviation

AFS

FS

 

 

Legacy

New (Functional Offices)

Term

NA

Safety Standards

Air Carrier Safety Assurance

General Aviation Safety Assurance

Foundational Business

Short Form

NA

Standards, Air Carrier, General Aviation, Business

Abbreviation

NA

SS, AC, GA, FB

 

 

 

Legacy

New (Functional Offices)

Term

e.g., AFS-200

Air Transportation

Short Form

e.g., AFS-200

NA

Abbreviation

e.g., AFS-200

NA

 

 

 

Legacy

New (Functional Offices)

Term

Flight Standards District Office

 

Certificate Management Office

 

Aircraft Evaluation Group

 

International Field Office

No change

Short Form

FSDO, CMO, AEG, IFO

No change

Abbreviation

FSDO, CMO, AEG, IFO

No change

 

 

Legacy

New (Functional Offices)

Headquarters

NA

Policy Divisions

Safety Standards

Field

Safety Assurance

(AC and/or GA)

Remotely-Sited Inspector (RSI)

Aviation Safety Inspector (ASI)

Categories: FAA/CAA, News, US